Design Innovation

Big Data, Social Analytics, Privacy, & Cybersecurity

What Is The GDPR?

What is the GDPR?

The GDPR represents new legislation that is destined to replace the General Data Protection Regulation, which has been in place since 1995. The arrival of the digital age means that the way people understand and interact with data is changing rapidly. The GDPR can help to clarify individual rights in the digital age, as well as creating a “digital single market” within the EU. With the GDPR in place, it will be easier for citizens to have control over their personal data, representing a shift in power.

The underlying principle of the GDPR is that the protection of personal data is a fundamental right, and organizations that handle personal data are responsible for those rights. “Processing” data means collecting, sharing, distributing, structuring, storing, or otherwise using an individual’s data. In this relationship, there are controllers and processors. A controller determines the purpose and means of processing personal data and is usually the collector of the data. Processors are engaged to process data on behalf of the controller, but the controllers are responsible for monitoring processors’ compliance.

The GDPR affects the North American market because any organization that offers goods or services to the EU or that monitors the behaviour of people within the EU is responsible for complying with the GDPR.

There are three key principles of the regulation:

  1. Limitation of processing means that: data must be processed only for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes; data must not be further processed in ways inconsistent with the initial purposes; data should be adequate, relevant, and necessary; data should be accurate and kept up-to-date; data should be kept only as long as necessary.
  2. Informed consent refers to freely given and clearly affirmative consent that must be intelligible, easily accessible, and written in plain language. Participants have the right to withdraw consent, and services cannot be withheld on condition of consent.
  3. Lawful processing pertains to at least one of the following conditions must be met:
    1. Consent from the data subject
    2. Processing is necessary for a contract
    3. Processing is necessary for compliance with EU laws
    4. Processing is necessary to protect a person’s vital interests
    5. Processing in the public interest or exercise of official authority
    6. Legitimate interests of the controller or a third party that are not overridden by the data subject’s rights and freedoms

Key Terms

  • Right to be Forgotten

This concept refers to personal data being deleted when the data subject no longer wants it to be processed. The exception to this is when there is legitimate reason to retain the data, for instance, in the case of completing a contract or complying with legal obligations.

  • Informed Consent

Information is made readily available and is communicated in clear, plain language. Informed consent will especially be enforced regarding services for children.

  • Right to Data Portability

Data subjects have a right to a copy of their personal data in an appropriate format and, where possible, they can transfer that data directly from one service provider to another. For example, individuals should be able to transfer photos from one social network to another.

  • Data Protection by Design and Default

This aspect helps protect users’ data by design, for instance by implementing technical safeguards like anonymization, pseudonymization, and encryption, as well as organizational safeguards.

  • Mandatory Data Protection Officer

A DPO fills the need for an organization to help monitor privacy and data protection. A DPO is an expert in their field, and is required if an organization’s core activities consist of regular and systematic monitoring of personal data on a large scale. This position helps ensure compliance and awareness of privacy legislation. The DPO may also monitor internal data protection activities, train staff, and conduct internal audits. If data subjects have inquiries, these will go through the DPO as well.

 

Company Response

Companies are responding to the GDPR in several ways:

  1. Stop buying and selling personal data
  2. Know where your clients live, or implement EU requirements regardless of location
  3. Prepare to respond to requests from data subjects
  4. Audit sub-contractors for compliance
  5. Reconsider cloud services

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